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Young female captives would rather volunteer to be suicide bombers to escape the constant hunger and abuse at the hands of Boko Haram

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Show of hands ‘Who wants to be a suicide bomber?’ ‘Me, me me’
Little Girls are becoming killers because they cannot bear the constant hunger and abuse at the hands of Boko Haram

‘…and the world watches. The global hystyeria crescendos whenever we are hit in the west at our train stations and airports. Rightly so, but it’s sparodic. This region is living this nightmare on an hourly basis. The plight of these young children deserves more attention, than the oft symbolic media show which has become our programmed response. Clearly the goverments in these countries are overwhelmed and require our comprehensive support. We should not standby, watching another regional crises metastasize, and come back to bite us in a matter of months, like ISIS’

  • Survivors say girls become suicide bombers to try and escape the jihadis 
  • They says how they were forced to become wives to Boko Haram fighters
  • Boko Haram used 44 girls as bombers this year, 40 more than last year 

Survivors say girls become suicide bombers to try and escape the jihadis
They says how they were forced to become wives to Boko Haram fighters
Boko Haram used 44 girls as bombers this year, 40 more than last year
Girls captured by Boko Haram in Nigeria are volunteering to become suicide bombers because they can no longer bear the sexual abuse and constant hunger they suffer as prisoners.
Many of the young women take the shocking decision as a last resort to try and escape the jihadi group, even if it costs them their life.
Women who managed to escape Boko Haram have revealed that the young bombers don’t believe in the radical ideology of the group but rather they want to run away from the nightmare conditions.
A young girl, Fati said that the militants turned up at her village, demanding to take the young girls to marry them off to their fighters. When the girls said they were too young, they were seized by force. She recalled the terrifying conditions inside the camps, which were regularly attacked by the Nigerian army, forcing the Islamists to move on a regular basis

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Fati (pictured) said that the militants turned up at her village, demanding to take the young girls to marry them off to their fighters. When the girls said they were too young, they were seized by force
3317620600000578-0-image-a-38_1460463664766
She recalled the terrifying conditions inside the camps, which were regularly attacked by the Nigerian army, forcing the Islamists to move on a regular basis

They would ask, ‘Who wants to be a suicide bomber?’ The girls would shout, ‘me, me, me.’ They were fighting to do the suicide bombings,’ Fati, a survivor of Boko Haram, told CNN.
Fati said that the militants turned up at her village, demanding to take the young girls to marry them off to their fighters. When the girls said they were too young, they were seized by force.
She said that some of the young girls living in Boko Haram’s base in the Sambisa forest were from the large group of schoolgirls taken from Chibok. She recalled the terrifying conditions inside the camps, which were regularly attacked by the Nigerian army, forcing the Islamists to move on a regular basis. Boko Haram child suicide bombings have surged 11-fold in West Africa over the last year, with children as young as 8, mostly girls, detonating bombs in schools and markets

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Boko Haram child suicide bombings have surged 11-fold in West Africa over the last year, with children as young as 8, mostly girls, detonating bombs in schools and markets

33175ae000000578-0-image-a-48_1460463771756

Across Nigeria, Niger, Cameroon and Chad, over 2.7 million people mostly women and children have now fled the Boko Haram-related violence

Across Nigeria, Niger, Cameroon and Chad, over 2.7 million people mostly women and children have now fled the Boko Haram-related violence
Women who managed to escape Boko Haram have revealed that the young bombers don’t believe in the radical ideology of the group but rather they want to run away from the nightmare conditions

3317607d00000578-0-image-a-49_1460463774897Women who managed to escape Boko Haram have revealed that the young bombers don’t believe in the radical ideology of the group but rather they want to run away from the nightmare conditions

Boko Haram child suicide bombings have surged 11-fold in West Africa over the last year, with children as young as 8, mostly girls, detonating bombs in schools and markets.
Suicide bombings have spread beyond Nigeria’s borders, with an increasing number of deadly attacks carried out by children with explosives hidden under their clothes or in baskets.
‘The use of children, especially girls, as so-called suicide bombers has become a defining and alarming feature of this conflict,’ said Laurent Duvillier, regional spokesman for UNICEF.
‘It’s basically turning the children against their own communities by strapping bombs around their bodies,’ he said.
There were 44 child suicide bombings in West Africa last year, up from four in 2014, UNICEF said, mostly in Cameroon and Nigeria.
She said that some of the young girls living in Boko Haram’s base in the Sambisa forest were from the large group of schoolgirls taken from Chibok

3318b1a800000578-0-image-a-41_14604636907781
She said that some of the young girls living in Boko Haram’s base in the Sambisa forest were from the large group of schoolgirls taken from Chibok

3318b1b000000578-0-image-a-42_1460463702456Abubakar Shekau who calls himself the “Emir” of Nigerian Islamist group Boko Haram has spoken of his aim to create a Caliphate in Africa

Abubakar Shekau who calls himself the ‘Emir’ of Nigerian Islamist group Boko Haram has spoken of his aim to create a Caliphate in Africa
Amnesty International estimates Boko Haram has kidnapped about 2,000 women and girls since 2014 for use as cooks, sex slaves, fighters and suicide bombers

160411091101-02-boko-haram-swails-super-169Fasumata left everything behind to flee Boko Haram. She feels lucky.children_suicide_bombers_v10

3318b19f00000578-0-image-a-40_1460463686548Amnesty International estimates Boko Haram has kidnapped about 2,000 women and girls since 2014 for use as cooks, sex slaves, fighters and suicide bombers
Islamist Boko Haram’s six-year campaign to set up an Islamic emirate in northeastern Nigeria has killed some 15,000 people, according to the U.S. military

3318b1c000000578-0-image-a-46_1460463763306Islamist Boko Haram’s six-year campaign to set up an Islamic emirate in northeastern Nigeria has killed some 15,000 people, according to the U.S. military

Some young children probably do not know they are carrying explosives, which are often detonated remotely, Duvillier said.
Islamist Boko Haram’s six-year campaign to set up an Islamic emirate in northeastern Nigeria has killed some 15,000 people, according to the U.S. military.
Outmanoeuvred after a regional offensive drove it from strongholds in Nigeria last year, it is increasingly using children to carry out attacks.
The tactic has proven effective in increasing the number of casualties as people do not usually see children as a threat.
Amnesty International estimates Boko Haram has kidnapped about 2,000 women and girls since 2014 for use as cooks, sex slaves, fighters and suicide bombers.
It is two years since the militants abducted some 270 Nigerian schoolgirls in Chibok, many of whom were forced to convert to Islam and marry their captors.

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One woman, who asked not to be named, cares for her sick twins with one suffering from malnutrition

331760fa00000578-0-image-a-44_1460463747360Almost one million Nigerian children are missing out on education as Boko Haram has destroyed more than 900 schools and killed more than 600 teachers, Human Rights Watch said

33175b2800000578-0-image-a-45_1460463750428Nigerian refugees gatehr together at the Minawao refugee camp in Northern Cameroon

Three-quarters of the suicide bombers have been girls, UNICEF said, who are often were thought less likely to arouse suspicion, although that may be changing now.
Abducted boys are forced to attack their own families to demonstrate their loyalty to Boko Haram, it said.
Although many children are being released from captivity as the military reclaims territory from Boko Haram, they often face stigma and rejection.
‘Some women would beat me,’ 17-year-old Khadija, who lives in a camp for displaced people in Nigeria, told UNICEF.
She and her baby, born of rape, escaped captivity during a Nigerian army attack on Boko Haram.
‘They said: ‘You are a Boko Haram wife, don’t come near us!” she told UNICEF.
Children are the main victims in one of Africa’s fastest growing humanitarian crises, UNICEF said, making up the majority of the 2.3 million people displaced since mid-2013.
Those separated from their families by the conflict and out of school are vulnerable to recruitment by armed groups, Duvillier said.
Almost one million Nigerian children are missing out on education as Boko Haram has destroyed more than 900 schools and killed more than 600 teachers, Human Rights Watch said.
‘Boko Haram is robbing an entire generation of children in northeast Nigeria of their education,’ Mausi Segun, Nigeria researcher at Human Rights Watch, said in a statement.

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