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Co-pilot survives being sucked halfway out of cockpit window – ‘Hero’ Captain of China’s Sichuan Airlines Airbus pulled in his co-pilot, made emergency landing, no passenger harmed

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“The windshield cracked suddenly and gave a huge bang. I looked aside and found half of the co-pilot’s body was already outside the window,” –  Capt. Liu Chuanjian
Chinese airliner’s co-pilot was sucked halfway out of a shattered cockpit window at 32,000 feet, on Monday
Captain Liu managed to pull his colleague back inside, then make an emergency landing
The Sichuan Airlines Airbus A319 was en route from Chongqing, southwest China to Lhasa, Tibet  when the terrifying mishap occurred while the 119 passengers were eating breakfast

“The windshield cracked suddenly and gave a huge bang. I looked aside and found half of the co-pilot’s body was already outside the window,” Sichuan Airlines Capt. Liu Chuanjian said, the South China Morning Post reported.
“Fortunately, his seat belt was fastened,” Liu added about the first officer, who was dragged back into the windswept cockpit, where the pressure and temperature plummeted.
“Everything in the cockpit was floating in the air,” the captain said, according to the BBC. “I couldn’t hear the radio. The plane was shaking so hard I could not read the gauges.”

Shot from inside the cockpit of the damaged Sichuan Airlines Airbus .pngInside shot of the damaged cockpit
The Airbus A319 was en route from Chongqing in southwest China to Lhasa in Tibet on Monday when the terrifying mishap occurred while the 119 passengers were eating breakfast.
“We didn’t know what was going on and we panicked,” a passenger told the state-run China News Service. “The oxygen masks dropped … We experienced a few seconds of free-fall before it stabilized again.”
The plane dropped to 24,000 feet as Liu struggled to regain control.
“The sudden loss of pressure and low temperature made me very uncomfortable and it was very difficult to make a single move when the aircraft was flying at 900 kilometers (560 miles) an hour and at such a high altitude,” Liu said, according to the Morning Post.

The broken window of on China's Sichuan Airlines, Flight 3U8633.jpg
The broken window on Sichuan Airlines  Flight 3U8633

Liu said he had to fly the plane manually because the automatic systems malfunctioned.
“I have flown this route a hundred times and know everything very well,” said Liu, who landed the plane safely in Chengdu.
The only injuries reported were to the co-pilot, who suffered a sprained wrist and facial cuts, and another crew member, who was slightly hurt as the plane dropped, Chinese aviation officials said.
The incident comes two months after a woman died after being partially sucked out of a Southwest Airlines jet that suffered a midair engine failure during a flight from New York City to Dallas.

 

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