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Ohio boy, 13, who executed teen girl because he feared he got her pregnant pleads guilty to murder, in juvenile court

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Sylvia McGee, 14, was shot to death in March, a block from her home in Canton, Ohio by a 13-year-old boy
The killer, now 14, pled guilty to killing the teen girl because he falsely thought she was pregnant, but the autopsy revealed she was not pregnant
The victim was not the boy’s girlfriend either
Teen defendant was not tried as an adult because he was 13 at the time of the crime.
He pled down aggravated murder charge down to murder
Will remain incarcerated in a youth prison until he is 21 and will undergo a psych evaluation. 
If he is deemed a serious youthful offender, he would be transferred to adult prison, serving 18 years to life 
Sentencing is scheduled for January
Sylvia McGhee 1.JPGVictim: Sylvia McGee, 14, was shot to death in March close to her home in Canton, Ohio by a 13-year-old boy who thought she was pregnant with his child

An Ohio teenager killed a 14-year-old girl after she told him she thought she was pregnant, because he reportedly feared he was the father.
In March, 14-year-old Sylvia McGee was fatally shot by a 13-year-old boy.
Isiah Lynch now 14, admitted in juvenile court to murdering 14-year-old Sylvia McGee, who was shot in the head on March 30, just a block from her home in Canton, Ohio.
Stark County Prosecutor John Ferrero said the evidence all suggested the girl was shot execution-style.
On Wednesday, in juvenile court, the teen boy pled true— the equivalent of guilty— to murder.
Assistant Prosecutor Michelle Cordova revealed the perpetrator had told police he and McGee believed she was pregnant with his child.
“That is what I believe got this whole thing started,” Cordova said on Wednesday, according to the Canton Repository.
“There was no evidence of any other reason for this.”
But McGee was not actually pregnant, Cordova says, citing an autopsy.

Isiah Lynch 1The defendant Isiah Lynch, now 14, from Canton, Ohio, admitted in juvenile court on Wednesday to murdering 14-year-old Sylvia McGee, who was shot in the head in March

A co-defendant, Michael J. Boykins, also 14, recently pled true to tampering with evidence, reduced from the more serious charge of  complicity to aggravated murder .
Boykins also pleaded true to a count of obstructing justice.
Boykins will serve a minimum of one year in youth prison but could remain there until age 21 depending on his behavior, Cordova said. He is scheduled to be sentenced December 2.
Cordova said Boykins had been more truthful than Lynch when interviewed by police.
He also agreed to testify against Lynch if the case went to trial.
Lynch, Boykins and McGee had known each other since attending elementary school in Canton, Cordova said, and had reconnected following their middle school years.
McGee was killed less than a block from her home between midnight and 4 a.m., according to the prosecutor’s office. Lynch, Boykins and McGee had spent time together in the early morning hours of March 30.
Investigators said Lynch shot McGee with a .38-caliber, semi-automatic handgun, Cordova said. Boykins witnessed the slaying but was not armed and did not fire any shots, she said.
The murder weapon was not recovered.

Carlina Hanley 1.JPG“It’s still not closure”: Carlina Hanley, McGee’s great aunt weeps in court on Wednesday

“It’s still not closure,” Carlina Hanley, McGee’s great aunt, told the Repository after the hearing.
“[Lynch] should have just admitted it from the beginning.
“She didn’t deserve that…She wasn’t that type of a kid. She was upbeat and funny. I just can’t believe that he did that.”
McGee was in the eighth grade at the Compton Learning Center’s Connections Program, wkyc reports.
“[She] was always funny, smiling, nothing ever dragged her down, not one thing,” the victim’s friend Tabitha McCarthy told the station after her death.
Before her death, McGee hoped to become a beautician.
“She talked about owning her own business,” Hanley said, according to the Repository.
“She talked about moving to New York and taking her maternal grandmother with her.”
“I knew that she could always excel in life, in anything that she chose to do,” she continued.
“She wanted everybody to get along. She wanted everybody to just be friends — that’s just the type of personality she had.”
The teenage defendant was not tried as an adult because he was 13 at the time of the crime.
The juvenile defendant accepted a plea agreement that brought an aggravated murder charge down to murder.
As part of the plea, the teen will remain behind bars in a youth prison until he is 21 and will undergo a psych evaluation. If he is deemed a serious youthful offender, Cordova says the boy would face time in adult prison of 18 years to life.
He will be sentenced in January.

 

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