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‘Femicide’ epidemic sparks public outcry in SA – Murder of college student Uyinene ‘Nene’ Mrwetyana, who was lured into post office, raped and beaten to death with a set of scales proves turning point, resulting in huge protests as tens of thousands gather in Cape Town

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Murder of teen who was lured into post office in Cape Town, SA, raped and beaten to death with a set of scales sparks huge protests
Tens of thousands gathered outside parliament in Cape Town, to protest epidemic of violence targeting women across the nation
Uyinene ‘Nene’ Mrwetyana, 19, was allegedly lured inside by a post office worker
Once inside she was allegedly raped and bludgeoned to death with the scales
42-year-old man who works at the Clareinch post office where she was last seen, has confessed to the rape and murder of the college student
The suspect’s identity is yet to be made public, aftes the court barred the public and media from revealing his identity because it could jeopardize the state’s case
Thousands protested in Cape Town today over a string of attacks on women 
Protesters say they are ‘not about attacking men but attacking the system that protects men and that offers them inherent privilege’
President Cyril Ramaphosa spoke to the demonstrators today promising to pursue changes, but was booed  

The suspect’s identity is yet to be made public. On Monday last week the court barred the public and media from revealing the identity of Uyinene Mrwetyana’s alleged killer and rapist until an identity parade had not been conducted at the time.

Revealing the name and or publishing the images of a suspect could sabotage the state’s case against that killer, authorities said.

The apparent ineffectual response by authorities to the rampage of brutal crimes and  violence sweeping South Africa in recent times, often targeting women and girl children, against a raging backdrop of xenophobic attacks against foreign residents, has left analysts wondering if the situation is being exacerbated by complacency or a smattering of complicity.

The deaths of Uyinene Mrwetyana, Leighandre ‘Baby Lee’ Jegels, and Janika Mallo, who were all brutally killed by men in this country over the past week, have sparked various movements across south Africa.
In the case of boxing champion Leighandre ‘Baby Lee’ Jegels, 25, she was allegedly shot dead on Friday by her partner, who was a police officer.
The spate of killings has sparked anger in a country often scarred by violence against women.

Campaigners say South Africa has a ‘femicide epidemic’ and thousands of them gathered in Cape Town to voice their anger today, holding signs saying ‘enough is enough’.
President Cyril Ramaphosa spoke to the crowd and promised ‘action’ but was booed by furious demonstrators today.
One sign held up by a demonstrator read: ‘Mr President, men are raping us, killing us, what are YOU doing?’
The protests are an embarrassment for Ramaphosa who is hosting the World Economic Forum conference in Cape Town this week.  

In a statement on Tuesday he called crimes against women a ‘stain on our national conscience’ but he was forced to cancel his appearance at the World Economic Forum’s plenary session to deal with the latest protests.
Yesterday young women gathered outside the conference venue in an effort to draw attention to the problem.
With chants of ‘we want justice’, protesters carried banners that read ‘Am I next?’, ‘Rape is a man’s issue’ and ‘This is a femicide epidemic, but it’s time to fight back’. Some scuffled with police outside the venue.
One demonstrator, 19-year-old Amber Wehr, said the protests were ‘not about attacking men but attacking the system that protects men and that offers them inherent privilege’.
Last year South Africa recorded a 6.9 per cent increase in the numbers of murders countrywide.
There were an average 57 murders a day and at least 137 sexual offences committed every day, according to official figures, in a country of 57 million.
Women Minister Maite Nkoana-Mashabane, said more than 30 women were killed by their spouses last month alone.


National Assembly Speaker Thandi Modise slammed the ‘senseless killings’ of women in the country.
‘It is clear that a war has been declared against women and girl children… it cannot be business as usual.
‘Extraordinary interventions are called upon to bring an end to these senseless acts of lawlessness. This is a crisis,’ she said.

Protesters outside Parliament in cape Town, SA over assault crimes 3Women’s rights campaigners and activists say South Africa has a ‘femicide epidemic’ and thousands of them gathered in Cape Town to voice their anger today, holding signs saying ‘enough is enough’
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